Tagged: perennial

Asian pears burst with shocks of white blossoms at the start of spring. 0

Asian Pear Tree

I chose Chojuro and Shinko Asian pear trees for the first guild that I designed to completion before doing any plantings, and have a fondness for them as the centerpiece within a prominent outdoor...

Daffodil planted near a cherry tree. 0

Daffodils

Beyond the burst of spring color, daffodils indicate how microclimates vary across a neighborhood or in sections of a yard. When planted as a border they offer a barrier against predation from mammals. A...

A blossom on wild bergamot, or bee balm, on the summer solstice. 0

Wild Bergamot

An essential for the forest garden, wild bergamot is a hardy native perennial that attracts pollinators and offers numerous medicinal uses. The entire aboveground plant is edible. Common Name: Wild Bergamot, Bee Balm, Horsemint...

A shock of blue flowers on Baptisia australis in May.. 0

Wild Blue Indigo

Wild blue indigo functions as a native nitrogen fixer in our Asian pear tree guild. A fast growing perennial that offers early flowers and shelter for pollinators, it’s inedible to humans and deer alike,...

Honeybees at the Little House on Pine 0

Beekeeping

Honeybees marked my first venture into livestock and have taught me a lot about how life works. I highly recommend keeping backyard bees for anyone who enjoys local honey, communing with wildlife, and watching...

Horseradish in bloom. Permaculture guild with cherry tree. 0

Horseradish

With sweetly scented flowers that attract pollinators and pungent leaves that confuse pests, horseradish makes a great edible necklace around fruit trees. An easy-to-grow culinary plant, I harvest the leaves to use in making...

Honeybees adore Jerusalem artichokes at the Little House on Pine. 0

Jerusalem Artichokes

Having read about the value of Jerusalem artichokes in permaculture books, I planted a few tubers from the grocery store. The next summer I had three stands of sunchokes with beaming yellow rays beloved...

Hazelnuts at the Little House on Pine 0

Hazelnuts

I planted a couple hazelnut shrubs, twiggy and sparse, to form a small hedge in the front yard. Two years later they filled in and started producing catkins. In their third year, I harvested...