Tagged: perennial

Rosemary is a great plant to incorporate into a culinary permaculture guild. 0

Rosemary

Rosemary is a staple in any culinary garden. Used as an herb, rosemary offers a pleasant floral pine flavor, as well as a myriad of benefits to your overall health. Here at the Little...

Rosemary focaccia bread is a staple at our homestead 0

Rosemary Focaccia Bread

Every week at our local farmers’ market, I admire the baked goods, especially the breads. I have always favored the focaccia, which were topped with sweet and savory ingredients that made the perfect breakfast...

Chickweed volunteers as a groundcover on the homestead. 0

Plant Inventory

At the Little House on Pine we try to identify every plant on our 1/4 acre lot. As we introduce new plants for food production and conservation landscaping, we prioritize with plants native to...

High in protein, the groundnut was an important food source for Native Americans. 0

Groundnut

A lesser known plant in edible landscaping, groundnut serves many important functions across three layers in the forest garden. Groundnuts like to climb and can clamber over unsuspecting herbaceous plants. Common Name: Groundnut Scientific...

A young New Jersey Tea plant gets ready for winter. 0

New Jersey Tea

As a native nitrogen fixing shrub with diverse functions, New Jersey Tea ranks among my favorite permaculture plants to fill out the shrub layer. Common Name: New Jersey Tea Scientific Name: Ceanothus americanus Family:...

A plant that prefers damp areas, we planted turtlehead in the wettest area of our native rain garden. 0

Turtlehead

Like its reptile namesake, turtlehead prefers damp woodland soils and can often be spotted by creeks and marshes. Native east of the Mississippi River (excepting Florida and Louisiana), turtlehead attracts pollinators aplenty. Common Name:...

Each bloom on flower-of-an-hour opens only for one day, and closes within a few hours. 0

Flower-of-an-Hour

A type of hibiscus with distinct lobed leaves, flower-of-an-hour is a welcome volunteer that secures loose soil and attracts pollinators. In the mallow family, it’s an edible cousin of okra. Common Name: Flower-of-an-Hour Scientific...

With its adorable violet flowers, creeping thyme gently sprawls a protective blanket over the soil while attracting pollinators. 0

Creeping Thyme

Creeping thyme ranks high among my favorite groundcovers. An edible evergreen, it controls weed pressure and attracts pollinators to the garden. Common Name: Creeping Thyme Scientific Name: Thymus serpyllum Family: Lamiaceae Uses Edible leaves...

Feverfew flowers bring bring instant happiness to the unsuspecting onlooker. 0

Feverfew

I adore the sunny charisma and herbal value of feverfew, but it can deter beneficial pollinators. Plant it far from flowering fruit trees, or use it to repel bees from outdoor living spaces. Common...

A non-native that is relatively hard to find, comfrey has many functions for the permaculture forest garden. 0

Comfrey

A versatile addition to any fruit tree guild, I use comfrey as a chop-and-drop living mulch and groundcover around my fruit trees. A medicinal herb great for pollinators that offers powerful soil enrichment, the...