Tagged: medicinal plant

A non-native that is relatively hard to find, comfrey has many functions for the permaculture forest garden. 0

Comfrey

A versatile addition to any fruit tree guild, I use comfrey as a chop-and-drop living mulch and groundcover around my fruit trees. A medicinal herb great for pollinators that offers powerful soil enrichment, the...

A blossom on wild bergamot, or bee balm, on the summer solstice. 0

Wild Bergamot

An essential for the forest garden, wild bergamot is a hardy native perennial that attracts pollinators and offers numerous medicinal uses. The entire aboveground plant is edible. Common Name: Wild Bergamot, Bee Balm, Horsemint...

Horseradish in bloom. Permaculture guild with cherry tree. 0

Horseradish

With sweetly scented flowers that attract pollinators and pungent leaves that confuse pests, horseradish makes a great edible necklace around fruit trees. An easy-to-grow culinary plant, I harvest the leaves to use in making...

Little House on Pine okra plant. 0

Okra

Okra makes an outstanding herbaceous canopy layer that provides light shade for interplanted annuals like lettuce and sweet potato, wind protection for peppers, and is certain to attract pollinators. Common Name: Okra, ladies’ fingers,...

Little House on Pine - Peach Tree 0

Peach Tree

One of the first trees I planted that bore fruit, the peach tree presents striking spring blossoms and a bounty of fruit great for fresh eating… if the squirrels don’t get to it first....

Honeybees adore Jerusalem artichokes at the Little House on Pine. 0

Jerusalem Artichokes

Having read about the value of Jerusalem artichokes in permaculture books, I planted a few tubers from the grocery store. The next summer I had three stands of sunchokes with beaming yellow rays beloved...

Hazelnuts at the Little House on Pine 0

Hazelnuts

I planted a couple hazelnut shrubs, twiggy and sparse, to form a small hedge in the front yard. Two years later they filled in and started producing catkins. In their third year, I harvested...