Tagged: honeybees

A young New Jersey Tea plant gets ready for winter. 0

New Jersey Tea

As a native nitrogen fixing shrub with diverse functions, New Jersey Tea ranks among my favorite permaculture plants to fill out the shrub layer. Common Name: New Jersey Tea Scientific Name: Ceanothus americanus Family:...

A plant that prefers damp areas, we planted turtlehead in the wettest area of our native rain garden. 0

Turtlehead

Like its reptile namesake, turtlehead prefers damp woodland soils and can often be spotted by creeks and marshes. Native east of the Mississippi River (excepting Florida and Louisiana), turtlehead attracts pollinators aplenty. Common Name:...

Horehound is a powerful medicinal plant that attracts many beneficial insects. 0

Horehound

Horehound is a wonderfully aromatic herb that attracts the beneficial tachinid fly (Trichopoda pennipes), which guards my pomegranate trees against the leaf-footed plant bugs (Leptoglossus phyllopus). Common Name: Horehound Scientific Name: Marrubium vulgare Family:...

A butter knife separates neat rectangles of clean comb from the wire supports. 0

Honey Harvest

Thanks to a little help from the chickens, the bees produced enough surplus honey to share with friends of the Little House on Pine. Kathy and Sarah took the lead on manual honey extraction...

Honeybees at the Little House on Pine 0

Beekeeping

Honeybees marked my first venture into livestock and have taught me a lot about how life works. I highly recommend keeping backyard bees for anyone who enjoys local honey, communing with wildlife, and watching...

Little House on Pine - A finished beeswax candle. In a mason jar, of course. 0

How to Make Candles from Beeswax

Starting in spring, honeybees at the Little House on Pine turn nectar into wax comb. By autumn, we’re getting ready to make candles. After harvesting the honey, we leave the honey-speckled¬†frames outside¬†for the bees...