Ricotta Cheese

We make a lot of Greek yogurt and kefir cheese here at the Little House on Pine. Each of these processes requires us to separate the whey, which is the liquid remaining after milk has been curdled. Whey is used in cheese making, but is also useful as a substitute for skim milk in baking. Whey is also a good source of thiamin, vitamin B12, pantothenic acid, magnesium, potassium, zinc and selenium, and a good source of riboflavin, calcium and phosphorus.

We store the whey as we go and eventually save up enough to make ricotta cheese! Yay cheese! This batch uses 1 gallon of whey.

Whey cool! 😉

Whey produced by making kefir cheese and Greek yogurt.

Whey produced by making kefir cheese and Greek yogurt.

Adding milk increases the amount of ricotta produced.

Adding milk increases the amount of ricotta produced.

Once the whey reaches 195°F, let it cool to 140°F.

Once the whey reaches 195°F, let it cool to 140°F.

Fresh ricotta cheese.

Fresh ricotta cheese, easy to make.


Fresh ricotta cheese.
Ricotta Cheese
Print Recipe
Servings
2 cups
Cook Time Passive Time
20 minutes 10 minutes
Servings
2 cups
Cook Time Passive Time
20 minutes 10 minutes
Fresh ricotta cheese.
Ricotta Cheese
Print Recipe
Servings
2 cups
Cook Time Passive Time
20 minutes 10 minutes
Servings
2 cups
Cook Time Passive Time
20 minutes 10 minutes
Ingredients
  • 1 gal whey
  • 1 qt milk optional, will create more cheese
Servings: cups
Instructions
  1. In a double boiler, bring whey and milk to 195°. Be careful not to let boil.
  2. Remove from the heat and let cool to 140°.
  3. Strain through a fine mesh strainer or clean dish cloth for 1-6 hours.
  4. Whey will continue to drip through creating a firm cheese for your enjoyment.
Recipe Notes

Adding milk is not necessary, however, it increases yield.

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