Fruit Kimchi

An addictive combination of sweet and spicy makes fruit kimchi a favorite dish on Pine Street. In Wild Fermentation, Sandor Katz describes how the sweet fruit melds with the sharp kimchi flavors, making for a surprising and memorable taste. I use his recipe as a guideline and modify ingredients based on availability of local fruit.

Little House on Pine- The sweet and spicy kimchi takes advantage of seasonal fruits.

The sweet and spicy kimchi takes advantage of seasonal fruits.

Fruit kimchi makes an invigorating breakfast, hunger-curbing snack, or guilt-free dessert. A deliciously evolving journey, the flavor changes the longer it ferments.

Mixed up fruits

Chop up the fruits to bite-sized pieces and blend together.

Like basic kimchi, I generously add gochugaru (Korean red pepper flakes) because the heat gets absorbed by the fermenting food. No need to add honey to this kimchi, it is suh-weet.

Mixed up fruits

The many textures enhance the experience.

Like cucumber kimchi, fruit kimchi can be enjoyed within a couple days. And like sauerkraut, if stored in a cool place it can prolong summer fruit flavors into winter.

Sweet and spicy fruit kimchi, bubbling in its jar.

Sweet and spicy fruit kimchi, bubbling in its jar.

Something

The sweet and spicy kimchi takes advantage of seasonal fruits.
Fruit Kimchi
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
10 servings 30 minutes
Passive Time
2-5 days
Servings Prep Time
10 servings 30 minutes
Passive Time
2-5 days
The sweet and spicy kimchi takes advantage of seasonal fruits.
Fruit Kimchi
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
10 servings 30 minutes
Passive Time
2-5 days
Servings Prep Time
10 servings 30 minutes
Passive Time
2-5 days
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Instructions
  1. Chop fruit into bite-sized pieces. Peel if you wish. Leave grapes whole.
  2. Add in any other fruit you want to try. Add nuts. Mix fruit and nuts together in a bowl.
  3. Add salt, lemon juice, and spices, and mix well.
  4. Stuff kimchi mixture into a clean, quart-size jar. Pack tightly into jar till brine rises above fruit. If necessary, add a little water to keep fruit submerged.
  5. Taste after a couple days to see whether it's fermented to your liking. As it ferments longer, it becomes increasingly alcoholic.
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