Honey Harvest

Thanks to a little help from the chickens, the bees produced enough surplus honey to share with friends of the Little House on Pine. Kathy and Sarah took the lead on manual honey extraction with butter knives, silicone spatulas, and strainers. No fancy honey extractors necessary, just good sticky fun.

Kathy and Sarah scrape honey from the comb into colanders for straining.

Kathy and Sarah scrape honey from the comb into colanders for straining.

Mashed up wax drains through a colander.

Gravity eases honey from the mashed up wax through a colander.

White-capped honey comb is ready to harvest.

White-capped honey comb awaits extraction.

It's hard not to be delighted when working with fresh honey comb.

It’s hard not to be delighted when working with fresh honey comb.

The result: from two hives we extracted about three gallons of honey. We jarred most of it and gave it away as gifts to friends and family during the holidays. We set a couple quarts aside to meet our honey needs for the year. And we saved a quart to make delicious mead.

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